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The Administrative Control and Transparency Authority organizes a training program on conducting financial investigations and corruption crimes and their practical applications

The Administrative Control and Transparency Authority organizes a training program on conducting financial investigations and corruption crimes and their practical applications
The Administrative Control and Transparency Authority organizes a training program on conducting financial investigations and corruption crimes and their practical applications

The Administrative Control and Transparency Authority (ACTA) organized a training program on conducting financial investigations and corruption crimes and their practical applications in cooperation with the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) (Phase I – Fundamentals and General Principles), which was held at Marsa Malaz Kempinski Hotel from 4 to 5 October 2021.

The program attracted speakers and experts from the UNODC, with the participation of employees from the Ministry of Interior, the Public Prosecution, the National Anti-Money Laundering and Terrorism Financing Committee, the Financial Information Unit, Qatar Central Bank, and the General Authority of Customs, through which various methods, systems and means used by criminals in general, to conceal or disguise the sources of their illicit gains were explained and discussed, while focusing on corruption as a predicate crime, the link between corruption and money laundering and the anti-money laundering framework in banks and other related entities.

The training program also dealt with several axes on providing an overview of how to deal with, certify and use financial evidence in corruption cases’ prosecutions, while discussing how to ensure the reliability and credibility of documents and financial evidence, as well as giving an overview of investigations and financial attachments and anti-corruption. In addition to introducing the methods that the state can use to recover funds and recover assets through international cooperation and mutual legal assistance in criminal matters, an overview of the types of evidence was also presented, including financial records, a discussion of how the evidence is analyzed, a discussion of how the evidence is collected, preserved, and indexed, and the preparation of an investigation report.

Furthermore, the program aimed in providing participants with compliance measures in banks and other related entities, while focusing on how prosecutors and investigators make use of the information contained in compliance documents during financial investigations, and information that can be gleaned from compliance documents. Also, the program provided a detailed discussion of how to read and analyze bank records, including bank statements, and wire transfers and checks for the purpose of redrawing the movement of funds.